Photo by Mark Lyndersay

Caribbean Datebook (September/October 2016)

Events around the Caribbean in September and October, from Indigenous Heritage Month in Guyana to Dominica’s World Creole Music Festival.

Jamaica-born debut author Nicole Dennis-Benn. Photo courtesy Nicole Dennis-Benn

Word of mouth (September/October 2016)

Caribbean writers star at the Brooklyn Book Festival, a new musical work remembers the Guyanese poet Martin Carter, and Trinidadians anticipate the sweet treats of Divali.

Team Wadadli: from left to right, Peter Smith, Nicholas Fuller, John Hall, and Archie Bailey. Photo by Ben Duffy, courtesy the Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge

Atlantic wide

It’s called the “world’s toughest row”: a transatlantic race from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean, powered by human strength. And in December 2015, the first-ever team from Antigua and Barbuda took up the challenge. Joanne C. Hillhouse learns more.

A Walk Back in Time: Snapshots of the History of Trinidad & Tobago

Caribbean Bookshelf (September/October 2016) | Book Reviews

This month’s reading picks.


Caribbean Playlist (September/October 2016) | Music Reviews

This month’s listening picks.

Still from Play the Devil

Caribbean Screenshots (September/October 2016) | Film Reviews

This month’s film-watching picks.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Dining like the ancestors

Our earliest Caribbean ancestors had a more diverse diet than we realise, writes Tracy Assing — and a “new indigenous” food movement is turning back to ingredients native to our ecosystems.

Photo by Mezart Daulet

Richard Fung: no easy readings

Born in Trinidad, based in Canada, navigating between identities — gay, Chinese-descended, Caribbean diaspora — filmmaker Richard Fung was “intersectional” before the term even existed, writes Jonathan Ali, and his complicated background informs his pioneering, innovative work.

Photo by Nadia Huggins

Sean Leonard: “Artists, this space is available”

Trinidadian architect Sean Leonard, co-founder of the Alice Yard art space, on the influence of family generosity and Carnival productivity on his practice, and Alice Yard’s decade-long experiment — as told to Stephen Stuempfle.

Photo by Tehron Royes

Jean “Binta” Breeze: memories from the verandah

Lauded as the first female dub poet, Jamaican Jean “Binta” Breeze writes from a sensibility informed by the political ferment of her youth, and her struggles with mental illness. David Katz finds out more.