Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Caribbean cooking for the future

In a time of hectic daily schedules, when many households rely on takeaway restaurant meals, how do culinary traditions get handed down? Franka Philip talks to three food writers in Trinidad, Jamaica, and the United States about the importance of cooking skills for young people.

I Rise

Caribbean Playlist (March/April 2015)

New releases to get you in the groove.

We Kind ah People

Caribbean Bookshelf (March/April 2015)

This month’s reading picks, from a debut Jamaican novel to an anthology of fresh Caribbean fiction.

Dash of colour: Jamaican Andre Rowe

Dash of colour: Jamaican Andre Rowe

Jamaican designer Andre Rowe creates dashing menswear with splashes of bold colour.

Photograph by Nicholas Laughlin

Word of mouth (March/April 2015)

The politics behind Trinidad’s Good Friday bobolees, Guyana’s Rupununi Rodeo, and the wrongs and rights of Jamaica Carnival.

Photograph by Tim Wright

Sail away: the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta

The Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta brings back the golden age of sailing in style.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

Fédon’s bequest

The 1795 rebellion led by the mixed-race planter Julien Fédon established a short-lived black republic in Grenada, writes James Ferguson — and has shaped the island’s economy to this day.

65 Gallus Street, recently restored by architect Laura Narayansingh. Photograph courtesy Laura Narayansingh

Trinidad & Tobago’s houses of history

A combination of neglect and commercial redevelopment has endangered Trinidad and Tobago’s unique architectural heritage for decades. But as Erline Andrews discovers, a handful of private individuals have bucked the trend, investing in restoration projects that give old buildings new life.

The 741-foot drop of Kaieteur was formed by the Potaro River’s gradual erosion of a soft sandstone plateau. Photograph by Philippe Kok

Kaieteur dreaming

With their 741-foot drop over a sandstone plateau, the majestic Kaieteur Falls are an icon of Guyana, and a must-see for adventure travellers. But while most visitors hop down on an airborne day-trip, a lucky few get to experience this natural wonder the old-fashioned way, travelling by boat up the Potaro River. Nicholas Laughlin recounts the journey, and the falls’ magnetic attraction.

In a wayang performance, the dalang sits behind a white screen, hidden from the audience, who see only the shadow silhouettes of the backlit puppets. Photography by Charles Chang

Sapto Sopawiro: man of shadows

The ancient shadow-puppet theatre of Java, known as wayang, was brought to Suriname in the nineteenth century — and survives thanks to the efforts of dalang Sapto Sopawiro. Chandra van Binnendijk meets the master.

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