The white sand and blue waters of Pinney’s Beach, home of Sunshine’s. Photo by Peter Phipp/Travelshots.com

Llewellyn Caines: “Sunshine” in paradise | Nevis

How did tiny Nevis come to have one of the Caribbean’s most famous beach bars? Garry Steckles meets Llewellyn “Sunshine” Caines and hears the story behind his Pinney’s Beach establishment, its celebrity clientele — and the lethally delicious Killer Bee rum cocktail. Plus: why a new geothermal project could soon make the island one of the world’s greenest destinations, and an exporter of energy to its neighbours.

Photo by Haak78/Shutterstock.com

The chocolate revolution in Trinidad & Tobago | Cookup

Trinidad and Tobago’s cocoa has long been considered among the best in the world, even though production has been declining for decades. A new generation of artisan chocolatiers are hoping to change that trend — while creating unique world-class chocolate products at home. Franka Philip finds out more.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

A compendium of curry | Cookup

From Jamaican goat to Trini doubles, curry is one of the definitive flavours of the Caribbean. There are hundreds of curry blends around the world — what are the Caribbean’s best, and how are they evolving? Franka Philip finds out.

Yvette LaCrette. Photo by Damion C. Jacob, DCJ photography

Grenada’s Chef Yvette LaCrette: ambassador of spices

Her culinary flair has made Yvette LaCrette “the Caribbean’s go-to-chef” in New York City, her home base. As Melissa Noel learns, Chef LaCrette is an always eager ambassador for the Spice Island.

Jamaica-born debut author Nicole Dennis-Benn. Photo courtesy Nicole Dennis-Benn

Word of mouth (September/October 2016)

Caribbean writers star at the Brooklyn Book Festival, a new musical work remembers the Guyanese poet Martin Carter, and Trinidadians anticipate the sweet treats of Divali.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Dining like the ancestors

Our earliest Caribbean ancestors had a more diverse diet than we realise, writes Tracy Assing — and a “new indigenous” food movement is turning back to ingredients native to our ecosystems.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Fresh from the farm

The farm-to-table movement is no longer just a foodies’ trend — it’s going mainstream, even in the Caribbean. Franka Philip explains why knowing where your produce comes from adds something special to your meal.

Looking down from the foothills of the Blue Mountains, past New Kingston to the city’s downtown and harbour. Photo by Matthew Henry

Kingston beat

For many visitors to Jamaica, the capital Kingston, at the foot of the Blue Mountains, is just the gateway to the country’s beach resorts. But, as Tanya Batson-Savage explains, Kingston’s bustling cosmopolitan scene and dynamic cultural offerings make it an essential destination. Here’s her list of must-sees and must-dos, from art to music to cuisine.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Soup without borders

Every Trini cook has a recipe for corn soup, tasty staple of family limes and street parties alike. But how would this creole delicacy go down with Japanese diners? And where do you find chadon beni and dhal in Japan? Suzanne Bhagan learns that humble soup can cross cultural boundaries.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Easter fare

No Caribbean holiday is thinkable without a delicious menu — and Easter weekend is no exception. Nazma Muller shares recipes for seasonal dishes from up and down the islands: Jamaican Easter bun, Bajan-style fried flying fish, and Martinique’s spicy matoutou crab stew.