Chronixx (a.k.a. Jamar McNaughton) • Reggae artist • Jamaica, Born 1992. Photo by Nickii Kane

25 Caribbean achievers under 25

Caribbean Beat celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2017. But this isn’t only an opportunity to look back at our quarter century of publication: it’s also a moment to look ahead to the new generation of talented, determined Caribbean people who will shape the decades ahead. In this special feature, we introduce 25 remarkable young people aged 25 and under. Athletes and entrepreneurs, artists and scientists — they and their contemporaries are the future of our region.

Derek Walcott. Photo by Horst Tappe/Getty Images

Remembering Derek Walcott (1930–2017) | Icon

St Lucian poet, playwright, and Nobel laureate.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

Harry Belafonte: calypso with a conscience

A beloved musical icon since the 1950s, Harry Belafonte has an equally long reputation as a political activist. And the parallel themes of his public life, entertainment and activism, both have their roots in Belafonte’s childhood in Jamaica. James Ferguson finds out more.

Photo courtesy Caribbean Airlines

Caribbean Airlines turns ten

Marking a decade of sharing the warmth of the islands, with the Caribbean’s favourite airline. Learn about anniversary plans, meet some star CAL employees, and more.

Mrs Fanny Eaton (c.1859; chalk on paper), by Walter Fryer Stocks

Fanny Eaton: forgotten beauty

In the paintings of the nineteenth-century British Pre-Raphaelite artists, one “exotic” face stands out. Fanny Eaton, born in Jamaica, was a mixed-race model who found herself, for a few years, near the heart of Victorian London’s art world — and was long forgotten. Judy Raymond tells what’s known of her story.

Photo by Hayley Madden for The Poetry Society

Vahni Capildeo: shapeshifter, time traveller

When Vahni Capildeo won the prestigious Forward Prize for her poetry, the award merely affirmed what her readers already knew: the Trinidad-born writer is a brilliant complicator of language, stories, conventions, and boundaries. Andre Bagoo explains why Capildeo’s poems are so exhilarating.

Leroy Sibbles. Photo by David Corio/Redferns/Getty Images

Leroy Sibbles: “You need conscious lyrics”

Leroy Sibbles of the Heptones on growing up in Trench Town, the golden days of Jamaica’s Studio One, and what’s missing from today’s music — as told to Garry Steckles.

Still from Rentyhorn: The Intervention (2008; video, 4.30 mins), by Sasha Huber. Courtesy Sasha Huber And The Museum Of Contemporary Art Kiasma, Helsinki

Nordic routes

In the distant latitudes of Scandinavia, three artists with Caribbean roots are making hard-hitting works that ask difficult questions about history and power. Nicole Smythe-Johnson talks to Jeannette Ehlers, Michelle Eistrup, and Sasha Huber.

Photo courtesy Rituals Music

Ever-blooming Calypso Rose

She’s a musical legend: the first woman to win T&T’s Calypso Monarch title, beloved by generations of Caribbean listeners. Now her latest album is winning her fans across Europe, and taking her sixty-year career in an unexpected new direction. Joshua Surtees profiles the inimitable Calypso Rose.

Photo by Mezart Daulet

Richard Fung: no easy readings

Born in Trinidad, based in Canada, navigating between identities — gay, Chinese-descended, Caribbean diaspora — filmmaker Richard Fung was “intersectional” before the term even existed, writes Jonathan Ali, and his complicated background informs his pioneering, innovative work.