Photo by Mezart Daulet

Richard Fung: no easy readings

Born in Trinidad, based in Canada, navigating between identities — gay, Chinese-descended, Caribbean diaspora — filmmaker Richard Fung was “intersectional” before the term even existed, writes Jonathan Ali, and his complicated background informs his pioneering, innovative work.

Photo by Tehron Royes

Jean “Binta” Breeze: memories from the verandah

Lauded as the first female dub poet, Jamaican Jean “Binta” Breeze writes from a sensibility informed by the political ferment of her youth, and her struggles with mental illness. David Katz finds out more.

Noel and Chevaughn Joseph (at left) with a Grenadian family helped by the Just Because Foundation: baby Shemmia with her parents Alisha and Shem. Photo by Warren Le Platte

The Just Because Foundation — a promise to JB

When Chevaughn and Noel Joseph’s young son JB was diagnosed with cancer, they promised him they would help other sick children. Nearly a decade later, the Just Because Foundation supports families at their time of greatest need, Lisa Allen-Agostini discovers.

Photo courtesy npm, Inc.

Trinidadian Laurie Voss: unbreaking the internet

Last March, an angry software developer deleted a JavaScript code package from the Internet. It doesn’t sound very exciting, but the result was thousands of broken websites, and a cascade of online errors. In stepped Trinidadian Laurie Voss, CTO of the web company npm. Mark Lyndersay tells the story of a coding rescue mission.

Wilmott at the Joytown Learning Centre with a class of young children. Photograph by Wayne Tippetts

Pastor Bobby Wilmott: Trench Town Triumph

Pastor Bobby Wilmott is a man who’s bent on converting Jamaica’s rough Trench Town into a place of hope he calls Joytown. Chris Salewicz explains.

Photo by Carl Court / Getty Images

Patricia Scotland: “I wanted to do”

The first woman to be elected Commonwealth secretary-general, Dominica-born Patricia Scotland has made history in more ways than one over her stellar career. Joshua Surtees interviews the new Commonwealth head and finds out where her passion for speaking up comes from.

A graveyard and old headstones: a typical scene around one of the many Baptist churches on the hills of the company villages. Photo by Marlon Rouse

The Merikins: heroes of the forgotten war

Two hundred years ago, a group of free black veterans of the War of 1812 arrived in Trinidad. In the island’s deep south, the villages they founded still preserve the traditions of the “Merikins,” as writer Judy Raymond and photographer Marlon Rouse discover — and still have much to teach their fellow citizens.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

Wilson Harris — into the interior

The Guyanese writer Wilson Harris, celebrating his ninety-fifth birthday in 2016, has lived far from his home country for many years — but Guyana’s landscape and history continue to haunt his magical imagination. James Ferguson explains how Harris’s novels bring together reality and dream.

Omari Banks: “All I wanted to do was play my guitar”

Omari Banks: “All I wanted to do was play my guitar”

Omari Banks on becoming the first Anguillan to play cricket for the West Indies, knowing when it was time to make a new career in music, and the power of passion — as told to Nadja Thomas.

Shakirah Bourne, writer and director of A Caribbean Dream, with Robin Whenary, director of photography. Photo by Neil Marshall, courtesy A Caribbean Dream

Barbadian Shakirah Bourne — living the Dream

Barbadian Shakirah Bourne became a filmmaker by accident — and learned her craft the hard way, through “guerilla-style” productions with minimal resources. Then a “dream” project came along: the chance to adapt and direct Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a Bajan setting. Naila Folami Imoja tells the story of how A Caribbean Dream came true.