Sargassum weed accumulating on Barbados’s east coast. Photograph by Romel Hall

Wide Sargassum sea

As coastlines across the Caribbean are inundated by masses of floating Sargassum weed, some entrepreneurs are trying to put the seaweed to good use. Shelly-Ann Inniss investigates.

The protected forest of Tobago’s Main Ridge is one of the Caribbean’s natural treasures. Photograph by Chris Anderson

Tobago: green as an island

Tobago may be best known for its breathtaking beaches, but the island’s natural beauty doesn’t end there. Helen Shair-Singh explores the attractions of forests, wetlands, and reefs, and explains how visitors can help preserve them for the future.

Photograph courtesy the Anthony N. Sabga Caribbean Awards for Excellence programme

Patrick Hosein: the quiet innovator

If you’ve ever used a smartphone, you’ve probably benefitted from the research of Trinidadian engineer Patrick Hosein. Raymond Ramcharitar finds out how.

Panoramic view of Las Cuevas Bay. Photograph courtesy TDC

Show me your blue flag

Only three Caribbean countries so far have beaches certified by Blue Flag, an international programme for assessing the health of coastal waters. Nazma Muller investigates why this matters to sea-bathers and the tourism sector alike.

Photograph courtesy Camille Wardrop Alleyne

Another giant leap: Camille Wardrop-Alleyne

When a three-year-old Camille Wardrop Alleyne watched the 1969 Moon landing on TV, she couldn’t have imagined she’d one day be part of the exploration of outer space. As a NASA scientist, she now helps run the International Space Station. And her second passion, as Erline Andrews discovers, is the campaign to get more young people — especially girls — into the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math.

Photograph by Mark Nuzum

Trinidad’s Leatherbacks: a Place to Nest

Amanda Mitchell-Henry goes turtle-watching in Trinidad.

Depositing bottles at Carib Glassworks. Photograph by Mark Wilson

Not just any old trash: recycling in the Caribbean

Not only does recycling have a positive impact on the environment, it can become a profitable business venture. Mark Wilson looks at some Caribbean businesses seeking to do both.

June too soon!

June too soon!

Between June and November, storms and hurricanes are possible, Fortunately, weather disturbances are tracked from the moment they are born these days, giving everyone not only ample time to prepare, but also providing a wonderful opportunity to observe one of Nature's forces unleashed.

Trinidad and Tobago's exhibit at Chelsea, 1987. Photograph courtesy Trinidad and Tobago Horticultural Society

Flower Power

The Caribbean has done well at the annual Chelsea Flower Show in London — and is reaping the rewards. Geraldine Flower reports.

Illustration by Kevon Webster

Get it while it’s hot: Barbados’ solar energy revolution

With abundant and free sunshine literally falling out of the sky, why haven’t more Caribbean countries followed the Bajans in adopting solar power? Helen Shair-Singh investigates how Barbados became a global solar pioneer.