Current Issue: Issue 143
( January/February 2017 )

In this Issue:

Embark

Mama Africa – Peter Tosh

Word of mouth (January/February 2017)

A new museum in Kingston pays tribute to reggae legend Peter Tosh; and it’s Carnival season across the Caribbean!

©Peeter Viisimaa / iStock.com

Datebook | Caribbean Events Calendar (January/February 2017)

Events around the Caribbean in January and February, from Chinese New Year in Suriname to a film festival in Guadeloupe

Still from I Am Not Your Negro

Caribbean Screenshots (January/February 2017) | Film Reviews

This month’s film-watching picks

Double Take

Caribbean Playlist (January/February 2017) | Music Reviews

This month’s listening picks

The Colour of Shadows

Caribbean Bookshelf (January/February 2017) | Book Reviews

This month’s reading picks

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Beyond another boundary: the Windies at the first T20 blind cricket World Cup

Come January 2017, the West Indies cricket team will head off to India to contest the T20 World Cup, alongside players from around the globe. Wait, you haven’t heard about this tournament? Maybe it’s time you started following blind cricket. Nazma Muller learns more

Guinep Table. Photography courtesy Mara Made Designs

Mara Made Designs — wood for life

Jamaican furniture line Mara Made Designs gives salvaged wood an elegant and environmentally friendly twist

Immerse

Mrs Fanny Eaton (c.1859; chalk on paper), by Walter Fryer Stocks

Fanny Eaton: forgotten beauty

In the paintings of the nineteenth-century British Pre-Raphaelite artists, one “exotic” face stands out. Fanny Eaton, born in Jamaica, was a mixed-race model who found herself, for a few years, near the heart of Victorian London’s art world — and was long forgotten. Judy Raymond tells what’s known of her story

Photo by Hayley Madden for The Poetry Society

Vahni Capildeo: shapeshifter, time traveller

When Vahni Capildeo won the prestigious Forward Prize for her poetry, the award merely affirmed what her readers already knew: the Trinidad-born writer is a brilliant complicator of language, stories, conventions, and boundaries. Andre Bagoo explains why Capildeo’s poems are so exhilarating

Teamdwp Studios By Dwayne Watkins

Carnival is mine

There’s no single, definitive version of Trinidad and Tobago’s Carnival — rather, there are as many versions as there are people who love the annual festival. For some, Carnival is mas. For others, it’s music. Some wait all year for J’Ouvert, others adore Panorama. There are thousands of different Carnival stories: here are just a few

Arrive

The serene bay at the fishing village of Parlatuvier. Photo by PHB.cz (Richard Semik) / shutterstock.com

Tobago therapy

If your Carnival plan involves a quiet getaway from the heat and the action, Tobago might be just the place you’re looking for. Caroline Taylor suggests all the ways Trinidad’s tranquil sister isle can soothe your spirit

Photo by Eric Baker / Shutterstock.com

Layover: St John’s, Antigua

Its location near the northern end of the Leewards makes Antigua an important hub for Caribbean travel. Our guide to exploring the island when time is tight

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Photo by T Photography / Shutterstock.com

Carnival planet

The Carnival spirit, celebrated across the Caribbean, isn’t unique to our region. In countries and cities across the world — many of them with a cross-cultural history — the weeks and days before Lent are a season of revelry

Richard Goldberg / Shutterstock.com

Roseau, Dominica | Neighbourhood

With its dramatic backdrop of mountains, narrow and picturesque streets, and historic architecture, the capital of the “Nature Isle” has a distinctive French Creole charm

Engage

Photo by jedamus / Shutterstock.com

This old house

The historic architecture of the Old Havana neighbourhood in Cuba’s capital is an artistic treasure trove

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

The remains of the Danes

Exactly a century ago, the Kingdom of Denmark sold its Caribbean possessions for $25 million to the United States. Commemorated in the US Virgin Islands, the anniversary is little remembered elsewhere — but, as James Ferguson writes, the story behind the event reminds us about the ambitions that drove European colonisation of our region

Photo by Nerhuz / Shutterstock.com

Electric Avenues

As the world grows more environment- and energy-conscious, electric cars seem like the transport of the future. And most Caribbean countries offer ideal conditions for their adoption, writes Shelly-Ann Inniss