For centuries, the vast plaza known as the Zócalo has been the heart of Mexico City. Photograph by Papa Bravo/shutterstock.com

Finding the centre in Mexico City

Nicholas Laughlin arrives in Mexico City, and realises his whole notion of geography is wrong. The Aztecs thought this was the centre of the universe — maybe they were right.

Andromeda Gardens, Bathsheba, Barbados. Photograph by John Webster

Earthy delights

The Caribbean’s public gardens are places to enjoy the pleasures of nature — and centres for research and conservation as well.

Castillo San Felipe del Morro. Photograph by  Colin D. Young/Shutterstock.com

Back and fort

The Caribbean’s history of wars and colonisation has left an extraordinary legacy of military architecture, some of it nearly five centuries old. Recognised today as historic sites, these forts and naval bases are a reminder of the often bloody past that shaped our present.

Snorkelling over one of the 110 ocean holes around Andros. Photograph by Brian O'Keefe

Andros: deepest blue

Largest of the Bahamas islands, Andros is known to intrepid adventure travellers for its spectacular natural attractions. Here you’ll find the world’s highest concentration of mysterious blue holes, writes Noelle Nicolls, plus the breathtaking Tongue of the Ocean, an enormous barrier reef, and the placid flats of Great Bahama Bank.

The buildings of St George’s climb the hill above the harbour. Photograph by PHB.CZ (Richard Semik)/Shutterstock.com

Clockwise Grenada: touring sunrise to sunset

Its quiet charms are well-suited to lingering, but Grenada is also small enough to explore in a single day, if time is of the essence. Caroline Taylor suggests a sunrise-to-sunset itinerary to introduce you to the best of the island — and ensure you want to return.

Sunset on the jetty at Rosewood Jumby Bay, with the Antigua “mainland” in the distance. Photograph courtesy Rosewood Jumby Bay

Resort to bliss

Bridget van Dongen isn’t usually the five-star-resort type. But when a new survey determined that four of the Caribbean’s most expensive holiday resorts are in Antigua and Barbuda, she decided it was time for some research into life on the edge of the infinity pool.

The remains of Dutch colonial buildings on Fort Island. Photograph by John Gimlette, Author Of Wild Coast: Travels On South America’s Untamed Edge

Far Essequibo

Rising in the Acarai Mountains near the southern border with Brazil and flowing to the Atlantic Ocean more than six hundred miles away, the Essequibo River is the greatest of the “many waters” that give Guyana its name. For centuries it was a highway into the country’s interior, and today it still offers a route through all of Guyana’s extraordinary natural landscapes — and some history lessons too. Here are snapshots from an imagined journey upriver, from the Essequibo’s broad estuary to the remote highlands where it begins.

The granite monoliths known as the Torres del Paine lend their name to Chilean Patagonia’s spectacular national park. Photograph by Georgia Popplewell

Ah, Patagonia!

At the “end of the world” — or, at least, the southern tip of South America — Patagonia has been a magnet for intrepid visitors for centuries. Trekking through a stunning landscape of mountains, glaciers, and lake, Trinidadian Georgia Popplewell understands why.

“Misfit” masqueraders in the Vulgar Fraction band. Photograph by Maria Nunes

Robert Young: Carnival in the belly

For designer Robert Young, leader of the “misfit” mas band Vulgar Fraction, the best way to navigate Port of Spain at Carnival time is by following one’s appetites. As told to Zahra Gordon.

At one of Bangkok’s floating markets, vendors offer a dizzying array of vegetables and fruit. Photograph by Nimon/Shutterstock.com

One year in Bangkok

Thailand is half a world away from Svenn Miki Grant’s home in Trinidad. But little moments of connection make a strange place feel familiar.