Snorkelling over one of the 110 ocean holes around Andros. Photograph by Brian O'Keefe

Andros: deepest blue

Largest of the Bahamas islands, Andros is known to intrepid adventure travellers for its spectacular natural attractions. Here you’ll find the world’s highest concentration of mysterious blue holes, writes Noelle Nicolls, plus the breathtaking Tongue of the Ocean, an enormous barrier reef, and the placid flats of Great Bahama Bank.

The buildings of St George’s climb the hill above the harbour. Photograph by PHB.CZ (Richard Semik)/Shutterstock.com

Clockwise Grenada: touring sunrise to sunset

Its quiet charms are well-suited to lingering, but Grenada is also small enough to explore in a single day, if time is of the essence. Caroline Taylor suggests a sunrise-to-sunset itinerary to introduce you to the best of the island — and ensure you want to return.

The granite monoliths known as the Torres del Paine lend their name to Chilean Patagonia’s spectacular national park. Photograph by Georgia Popplewell

Ah, Patagonia!

At the “end of the world” — or, at least, the southern tip of South America — Patagonia has been a magnet for intrepid visitors for centuries. Trekking through a stunning landscape of mountains, glaciers, and lake, Trinidadian Georgia Popplewell understands why.

Sunset on the jetty at Rosewood Jumby Bay, with the Antigua “mainland” in the distance. Photograph courtesy Rosewood Jumby Bay

Resort to bliss

Bridget van Dongen isn’t usually the five-star-resort type. But when a new survey determined that four of the Caribbean’s most expensive holiday resorts are in Antigua and Barbuda, she decided it was time for some research into life on the edge of the infinity pool.

The remains of Dutch colonial buildings on Fort Island. Photograph by John Gimlette, Author Of Wild Coast: Travels On South America’s Untamed Edge

Far Essequibo

Rising in the Acarai Mountains near the southern border with Brazil and flowing to the Atlantic Ocean more than six hundred miles away, the Essequibo River is the greatest of the “many waters” that give Guyana its name. For centuries it was a highway into the country’s interior, and today it still offers a route through all of Guyana’s extraordinary natural landscapes — and some history lessons too. Here are snapshots from an imagined journey upriver, from the Essequibo’s broad estuary to the remote highlands where it begins.

“Misfit” masqueraders in the Vulgar Fraction band. Photograph by Maria Nunes

Robert Young: Carnival in the belly

For designer Robert Young, leader of the “misfit” mas band Vulgar Fraction, the best way to navigate Port of Spain at Carnival time is by following one’s appetites. As told to Zahra Gordon.

At one of Bangkok’s floating markets, vendors offer a dizzying array of vegetables and fruit. Photograph by Nimon/Shutterstock.com

One year in Bangkok

Thailand is half a world away from Svenn Miki Grant’s home in Trinidad. But little moments of connection make a strange place feel familiar.

Gros Piton from the summit of Petit Piton. Photograph by Chris Huxley

Peak conditions: taking on the Caribbean’s mountain ranges

The Caribbean is a region of hills and mountains, not just beaches and bays. Maria Sebastian tackles the double challenge of St Lucia’s Pitons, and Janelle Chanona braves the rigours of Belize’s Victoria Peak. Plus vertical adventures in Cuba, Guyana, Dominica, and Trinidad.

The Cockpit Country’s landscape of rounded hills and deep valleys  is thanks to its limestone geology. Photograph by Martei Korley

Mountains of memory: Jamaica’s Cockpit Country

Centuries after the Maroon wars that shaped its history, Jamaica’s Cockpit Country remains as mysterious as it is beautiful. Michael Robinson traverses this landscape of hills and forest, and finds its inhabitants are proud of their connections to the past.

Photograph by Dri Castro

Los Roques: 50 shades of blue

Off the north coast of Venezuela, Los Roques is an archipelago of white sand cays surrounded by numerous shades of breathtaking blue sea.