Photo by Mezart Daulet

Richard Fung: no easy readings

Born in Trinidad, based in Canada, navigating between identities — gay, Chinese-descended, Caribbean diaspora — filmmaker Richard Fung was “intersectional” before the term even existed, writes Jonathan Ali, and his complicated background informs his pioneering, innovative work.

Photo by Nadia Huggins

Sean Leonard: “Artists, this space is available”

Trinidadian architect Sean Leonard, co-founder of the Alice Yard art space, on the influence of family generosity and Carnival productivity on his practice, and Alice Yard’s decade-long experiment — as told to Stephen Stuempfle.

Photo by Tehron Royes

Jean “Binta” Breeze: memories from the verandah

Lauded as the first female dub poet, Jamaican Jean “Binta” Breeze writes from a sensibility informed by the political ferment of her youth, and her struggles with mental illness. David Katz finds out more.

Ian Walton/Getty Images

Gold standard: the Caribbean’s Olympic contenders for Rio 2016

When it comes to athletics, the Caribbean — Jamaica in particular — has dominated the field for the past decade. And as the 2016 Olympics open this August in Rio de Janeiro, all eyes will be on Usain Bolt and his peers from across the region. Kwame Laurence profiles some of our leading Olympic contenders.

Photo by Carl Court / Getty Images

Patricia Scotland: “I wanted to do”

The first woman to be elected Commonwealth secretary-general, Dominica-born Patricia Scotland has made history in more ways than one over her stellar career. Joshua Surtees interviews the new Commonwealth head and finds out where her passion for speaking up comes from.

A graveyard and old headstones: a typical scene around one of the many Baptist churches on the hills of the company villages. Photo by Marlon Rouse

The Merikins: heroes of the forgotten war

Two hundred years ago, a group of free black veterans of the War of 1812 arrived in Trinidad. In the island’s deep south, the villages they founded still preserve the traditions of the “Merikins,” as writer Judy Raymond and photographer Marlon Rouse discover — and still have much to teach their fellow citizens.

Omari Banks: “All I wanted to do was play my guitar”

Omari Banks: “All I wanted to do was play my guitar”

Omari Banks on becoming the first Anguillan to play cricket for the West Indies, knowing when it was time to make a new career in music, and the power of passion — as told to Nadja Thomas.

Shakirah Bourne, writer and director of A Caribbean Dream, with Robin Whenary, director of photography. Photo by Neil Marshall, courtesy A Caribbean Dream

Barbadian Shakirah Bourne — living the Dream

Barbadian Shakirah Bourne became a filmmaker by accident — and learned her craft the hard way, through “guerilla-style” productions with minimal resources. Then a “dream” project came along: the chance to adapt and direct Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a Bajan setting. Naila Folami Imoja tells the story of how A Caribbean Dream came true.

From artist David Gumbs’s Unconscious Geographies installation (2016). Image courtesy David Gumbs

Five Caribbean artists in the brave new digital world

Artists are always eager to experiment with new tools, so it’s no surprise that digital media offer them a creative playground. Nicole Smythe-Johnson surveys how Caribbean artists are exploring digital possibilities, and introduces five young creatives shaping the ways we experience digital images.

Nalo Hopkinson. Photo by David Findlay, courtesy Nalo Hopkinson

Stories of what-if

Call it sci-fi, speculative fiction, fantasy — it’s one of the world’s most popular genres of storytelling, and a growing wave of Caribbean writers are bringing our voices, culture, and history to tales of mythical pasts and thrilling futures, lost worlds and faraway planets. Philip Sander talks to sci-fi authors Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, and R.S.A. Garcia.