Euzhan Palcy in 1992 — an alternate photo from the shoot that produced our first cover, twenty-five years ago. Bettmann / Getty Images

The Beat goes on

For 25 years, Caribbean Beat has celebrated the best and brightest of Caribbean culture and people — as you can see in the panorama of our 144 covers, and the stories behind them.

Mrs Fanny Eaton (c.1859; chalk on paper), by Walter Fryer Stocks

Fanny Eaton: forgotten beauty

In the paintings of the nineteenth-century British Pre-Raphaelite artists, one “exotic” face stands out. Fanny Eaton, born in Jamaica, was a mixed-race model who found herself, for a few years, near the heart of Victorian London’s art world — and was long forgotten. Judy Raymond tells what’s known of her story.

Photo by Hayley Madden for The Poetry Society

Vahni Capildeo: shapeshifter, time traveller

When Vahni Capildeo won the prestigious Forward Prize for her poetry, the award merely affirmed what her readers already knew: the Trinidad-born writer is a brilliant complicator of language, stories, conventions, and boundaries. Andre Bagoo explains why Capildeo’s poems are so exhilarating.

Teamdwp Studios By Dwayne Watkins

Carnival is mine

There’s no single, definitive version of Trinidad and Tobago’s Carnival — rather, there are as many versions as there are people who love the annual festival. For some, Carnival is mas. For others, it’s music. Some wait all year for J’Ouvert, others adore Panorama. There are thousands of different Carnival stories: here are just a few.

Leroy Sibbles. Photo by David Corio/Redferns/Getty Images

Leroy Sibbles: “You need conscious lyrics”

Leroy Sibbles of the Heptones on growing up in Trench Town, the golden days of Jamaica’s Studio One, and what’s missing from today’s music — as told to Garry Steckles.

Still from Rentyhorn: The Intervention (2008; video, 4.30 mins), by Sasha Huber. Courtesy Sasha Huber And The Museum Of Contemporary Art Kiasma, Helsinki

Nordic routes

In the distant latitudes of Scandinavia, three artists with Caribbean roots are making hard-hitting works that ask difficult questions about history and power. Nicole Smythe-Johnson talks to Jeannette Ehlers, Michelle Eistrup, and Sasha Huber.

Photo courtesy Rituals Music

Ever-blooming Calypso Rose

She’s a musical legend: the first woman to win T&T’s Calypso Monarch title, beloved by generations of Caribbean listeners. Now her latest album is winning her fans across Europe, and taking her sixty-year career in an unexpected new direction. Joshua Surtees profiles the inimitable Calypso Rose.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Woman business

Two friends in a bar, and a problem to solve. New fiction by Barbara Jenkins.

Photo by Mezart Daulet

Richard Fung: no easy readings

Born in Trinidad, based in Canada, navigating between identities — gay, Chinese-descended, Caribbean diaspora — filmmaker Richard Fung was “intersectional” before the term even existed, writes Jonathan Ali, and his complicated background informs his pioneering, innovative work.

Photo by Nadia Huggins

Sean Leonard: “Artists, this space is available”

Trinidadian architect Sean Leonard, co-founder of the Alice Yard art space, on the influence of family generosity and Carnival productivity on his practice, and Alice Yard’s decade-long experiment — as told to Stephen Stuempfle.