Bathsheba, on Barbados’s east coast. ©iStock.com/Tomml

My Barbados

Six Barbadians from diverse backgrounds talk to Nailah Folami Imoja about their lives and work, what they love best about their home island, and their biggest hopes for the future, as Barbados marks fifty years of Independence.

Holger Leue/LPI/Getty Images

Word of mouth (July/August 2016)

Barbados Crop Over and the Leeds West Indian Carnival are two stars of the August festival season.

Shakirah Bourne, writer and director of A Caribbean Dream, with Robin Whenary, director of photography. Photo by Neil Marshall, courtesy A Caribbean Dream

Barbadian Shakirah Bourne — living the Dream

Barbadian Shakirah Bourne became a filmmaker by accident — and learned her craft the hard way, through “guerilla-style” productions with minimal resources. Then a “dream” project came along: the chance to adapt and direct Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream in a Bajan setting. Nailah Folami Imoja tells the story of how A Caribbean Dream came true.

From artist David Gumbs’s Unconscious Geographies installation (2016). Image courtesy David Gumbs

Five Caribbean artists in the brave new digital world

Artists are always eager to experiment with new tools, so it’s no surprise that digital media offer them a creative playground. Nicole Smythe-Johnson surveys how Caribbean artists are exploring digital possibilities, and introduces five young creatives shaping the ways we experience digital images.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Easter fare

No Caribbean holiday is thinkable without a delicious menu — and Easter weekend is no exception. Nazma Muller shares recipes for seasonal dishes from up and down the islands: Jamaican Easter bun, Bajan-style fried flying fish, and Martinique’s spicy matoutou crab stew.

Nalo Hopkinson. Photo by David Findlay, courtesy Nalo Hopkinson

Stories of what-if

Call it sci-fi, speculative fiction, fantasy — it’s one of the world’s most popular genres of storytelling, and a growing wave of Caribbean writers are bringing our voices, culture, and history to tales of mythical pasts and thrilling futures, lost worlds and faraway planets. Philip Sander talks to sci-fi authors Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, and R.S.A. Garcia.

Troy Weekes. Photo courtesy Troy Weekes

Troy Weekes: “We too can be creators”

Barbadian Troy Weekes, systems designer and education entrepreneur, on rethinking how children learn and how Caribbean people interact with digital technology— as told to Tracy Assing.

Photo by Bart Sims

Ewan Atkinson: boy next door

The fictional Neighbourhood invented by Barbadian artist Ewan Atkinson is like a childhood fantasy complicated by grown-up concerns, Allison Thompson writes.

Photograph courtesy the Barbados Pocket Guide / www.barbadospocketguide.com

Bim by bus

How Barbados’s public transport system makes it one of the easiest Caribbean islands to get around, for locals and tourists alike.

Sargassum weed accumulating on Barbados’s east coast. Photograph by Romel Hall

Wide Sargassum sea

As coastlines across the Caribbean are inundated by masses of floating Sargassum weed, some entrepreneurs are trying to put the seaweed to good use. Shelly-Ann Inniss investigates.