A75T6X Taino Indian petroglyphs on basalt rock on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts

First things first: the Caribbean’s First Peoples

The Caribbean’s First Peoples shaped our landscapes, language, and culture — and across the region, our indigenous heritage remains within reach, if you know where to look.

Niven Narain. Photo courtesy Berg LLC

Niven Narain: smarter medicine

The tragic death of his grandmother inspired Niven Narain’s career in cutting-edge cancer research. Erline Andrews learns how the Guyanese-American scientist is pioneering the use of artificial intellignce to create better, cheaper drugs for all.

Aerial image of Ayangaik mountain, Upper Mazaruni District, Guyana. Photo by Corbis Images

Wild frontier

Ayangaik Mountain in Guyana’s thickly forested north-west seems to belong to a different world and time.

Baroness Valerie Amos. Photo courtesy The School of Oriental and African Studies

Baroness Valerie Amos: Wakenaam to Westminster

Born on a tiny island in Guyana’s Essequibo River, Baroness Valerie Amos has journeyed to the world’s corridors of power. As Joshua Surtees discovers, her Caribbean heritage has journeyed with her.

Photograph © Mariusz Prusaczyk/iStock.com

Mt Roraima: “I could hardly imagine how we came all this way”

Caribbean Beat editor Nicholas Laughlin on his trek to Mt Roraima, his most memorable trip in a decade of travel.

Jazz time on Pigeon Island, St Lucia. Photograph by Chris Huxley

Island Beat (May/June 2001)

Coming events around the islands.

Depositing bottles at Carib Glassworks. Photograph by Mark Wilson

Not just any old trash: recycling in the Caribbean

Not only does recycling have a positive impact on the environment, it can become a profitable business venture. Mark Wilson looks at some Caribbean businesses seeking to do both.

Pick of the month

Caribbean Bookshelf (May/June 2001)

New and recent books about the Caribbean.

The 741-foot drop of Kaieteur was formed by the Potaro River’s gradual erosion of a soft sandstone plateau. Photograph by Philippe Kok

Kaieteur dreaming

With their 741-foot drop over a sandstone plateau, the majestic Kaieteur Falls are an icon of Guyana, and a must-see for adventure travellers. But while most visitors hop down on an airborne day-trip, a lucky few get to experience this natural wonder the old-fashioned way, travelling by boat up the Potaro River. Nicholas Laughlin recounts the journey, and the falls’ magnetic attraction.

Photograph by Nicholas Laughlin

Word of mouth (March/April 2015)

The politics behind Trinidad’s Good Friday bobolees, Guyana’s Rupununi Rodeo, and the wrongs and rights of Jamaica Carnival.