Take twenty: cricket, that is

Take twenty: cricket, that is

Garry Steckles previews the 2014 Caribbean Premier League Twenty20 cricket tournament, which starts sports lovers’ pulses racing in July.

A-dZiko Simba Gegele, winner of the 2014 Burt Award. Photograph by Marlon James

Ready, set, read

In the quest to encourage reading habits in the Caribbean, books aimed at young adults have been in short supply. As Erline Andrews finds out, the new Burt Award for Caribbean Literature aims to change that.

“Surfing is for  everyone,” says Icah Wilmot. Photography by Marlon James

Icah Wilmot: star of the surf

For Icah Wilmot, Jamaica’s only pro surfer, his championship career is both a family enterprise and a vehicle for moving his sport ahead. Michael Robinson visits Jamaica’s first family of surfing at their Jamnesia headquarters in Bull Bay.

The Rousseau sisters, Michelle and Suzanne. Photographs courtesy Two Sisters and a Meal

Tell it on the blue mountain: Michelle and Suzanne Rousseau

They’re celebrity chefs at home in Jamaica, thanks to their restaurant, their catering business, and their popular online TV series. Now the Rousseau sisters, Michelle and Suzanne, plan to take the international culinary world by storm with a new recipe book. Nazma Muller finds out more.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

Minnows’ hope

There are no Caribbean teams in the FIFA World Cup finals this year, James Ferguson reminds us. But sports fans can still reflect on past victories and hope for future ones.

Students participate in a robotics workshop. Photograph by Tracy Mamoun

Alpha plus: Jamaica’s Alpha Boys School

Fans of Jamaican culture know that the decades-old music programme at Kingston’s Alpha Boys School has produced dozens of the island’s best musicians. But adapting to the twenty-first century means adding to that legacy with innovative new social entrepreneurship programmes. Tanya Batson-Savage investigates.

Photograph by Salim October/Shutterstock.com

Caribbean Datebook (March/April 2014)

Events around the Caribbean in March and April.

Chin’s mother and husband join her on The Voice stage, after she was named winner of the contest. NBCU Photo Bank Via Getty Images

Tessanne Chin: a star is made

By the time Tessanne Chin emerged as the champion of the US reality TV talent show The Voice, the Jamaican singer had already won herself millions of fans around the world — and stolen the hearts of her compatriots. But, with a track record on the Jamaican music scene going back a decade, hers was no magical story of overnight success. Kellie Magnus tells the story of a triumph that was a long time in the making.

Karl “Cannonball” Bryan. Photograph by Jim Baine

Karl “Cannonball” Bryan: the joy of sax

When Garry Steckles encounters a sublime saxophone musician in a Toronto market, little does he realise he’s stumbled upon a piece of Jamaican musical history.

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

Thoroughly modern Millie Small

In the chilly spring of 1964, a debut single by an unknown Jamaican singer became a surprise musical hit in Britain, before storming pop charts around the world. Millie Small’s infectious “My Boy Lollipop” sounded like nothing before, and it helped clear the way for global domination by Jamaican music. James Ferguson recalls the unlikely story.

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