Photo by Chris Anderson

Charlotteville, Tobago

At Tobago’s north-eastern tip, Charlotteville remains a rustic retreat, almost the epicentre of the island’s natural beauty.

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Soup without borders

Every Trini cook has a recipe for corn soup, tasty staple of family limes and street parties alike. But how would this creole delicacy go down with Japanese diners? And where do you find chadon beni and dhal in Japan? Suzanne Bhagan learns that humble soup can cross cultural boundaries.

Photo by Marlon James

Bene Caribe — good to wear

Trinidad-based non-profit label Bene Caribe supports local charities through stylish looks.

From artist David Gumbs’s Unconscious Geographies installation (2016). Image courtesy David Gumbs

Five Caribbean artists in the brave new digital world

Artists are always eager to experiment with new tools, so it’s no surprise that digital media offer them a creative playground. Nicole Smythe-Johnson surveys how Caribbean artists are exploring digital possibilities, and introduces five young creatives shaping the ways we experience digital images.

Nalo Hopkinson. Photo by David Findlay, courtesy Nalo Hopkinson

Stories of what-if

Call it sci-fi, speculative fiction, fantasy — it’s one of the world’s most popular genres of storytelling, and a growing wave of Caribbean writers are bringing our voices, culture, and history to tales of mythical pasts and thrilling futures, lost worlds and faraway planets. Philip Sander talks to sci-fi authors Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, and R.S.A. Garcia.

Angelo Bissessarsingh at home, surrounded by his library and collection of artifacts. Photo by Mark Lyndersay

Angelo Bissessarsingh: back in times

For Trinidadian Angelo Bissessarsingh, what started as a childhood obsession with yesteryear artefacts grew into a passion for researching and writing about history that’s helped reignite public interest in T&T’s complicated past. Judy Raymond tells the story of a young historian’s archive and love for what once was.

Ducks at their ease, enjoying the tranquillity of the Pointe-àˆ-Pierre Wildfowl Trust. Photo by Stacey Williams

Wild as the wind: the Pointe-à-Pierre Wildfowl Trust

Picture a lush oasis of lakes surrounded by green forest, where rare ducks swim among waterlilies, cormorants sun themselves on overhanging branches, and the cries of parakeets fill the air — and all this in the middle of an oil refinery complex. Andre Bagoo visits Trinidad’s Pointe-à-Pierre Wildfowl Trust, celebrating five decades of nurturing endangered birds.

The popular Carnival band Yuma hits the Socadrome stage. Photo by Dwayne Watkins

Not your parents’ carnival

Times change, and Carnival changes with it — for better or for worse? Mark Lyndersay, Laura Dowrich, and Tracy Assing talk to eight Carnival insiders about the state of the mas and the state of the music, where the festival is heading, and how it will get there.

Peter Minshall on the road with the band. Photo by George Tang

The history of paradise: on Peter Minshall’s Paradise Lost

It’s the stuff of Carnival legend: the eruption of masman Peter Minshall’s Paradise Lost on the streets of Port of Spain, forty years ago. Now a new documentary, using long-forgotten archival footage, brings the band back to life. Ray Funk tells the story.

Photo by Maria Nunes

Word of mouth (January/February 2016)

T&T’s Carnival Kings and Queens cross the stage, while regional Carnival celebrations across the two islands have all the energy without Port of Spain’s crowds and chaos.