Issue 138
( March/April 2016 )

In this Issue:

Embark

Photo courtesy Gerrard Wilson Photography

Caribbean Datebook (March/April 2016)

Your guide to Caribbean events in March and April, from St Patrick’s Day in Montserrat to jazz in Tobago

Photo by Nagornyi / shutterstock.com

Word of mouth (March/April 2016)

Dry season is now literature season in the Caribbean, with half a dozen festivals bringing writers to readers, plus a new exhibition in London captures the heyday of lovers rock

Swimwear from Trèfle’s Atacama collection. Photo by Teeona Lane

Let them bloom: Kristin Frazer

Designer Kristin Frazer of the British Virgin Islands creates swimwear inspired by desert blooms, to flatter bathing beauties of all shapes

The Whale House

Caribbean Bookshelf (March/April 2016)

This month’s reading picks

Spice Island

Caribbean Playlist (March/April 2016)

This month’s listening picks

Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Easter fare

No Caribbean holiday is thinkable without a delicious menu — and Easter weekend is no exception. Nazma Muller shares recipes for seasonal dishes from up and down the islands: Jamaican Easter bun, Bajan-style fried flying fish, and Martinique’s spicy matoutou crab stew

Immerse

Nalo Hopkinson. Photo by David Findlay, courtesy Nalo Hopkinson

Stories of what-if

Call it sci-fi, speculative fiction, fantasy — it’s one of the world’s most popular genres of storytelling, and a growing wave of Caribbean writers are bringing our voices, culture, and history to tales of mythical pasts and thrilling futures, lost worlds and faraway planets. Philip Sander talks to sci-fi authors Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, and R.S.A. Garcia

Troy Weekes. Photo courtesy Troy Weekes

Troy Weekes: “We too can be creators”

Barbadian Troy Weekes, systems designer and education entrepreneur, on rethinking how children learn and how Caribbean people interact with digital technology— as told to Tracy Assing

Angelo Bissessarsingh at home, surrounded by his library and collection of artifacts. Photo by Mark Lyndersay

Angelo Bissessarsingh: back in times

For Trinidadian Angelo Bissessarsingh, what started as a childhood obsession with yesteryear artefacts grew into a passion for researching and writing about history that’s helped reignite public interest in T&T’s complicated past. Judy Raymond tells the story of a young historian’s archive and love for what once was

Photo by Amanda Richards

Flying season

Breezy dry season weather across the Caribbean makes Easter the perfect time to test your kite-building and -flying skills

Arrive

Ducks at their ease, enjoying the tranquillity of the Pointe-àˆ-Pierre Wildfowl Trust. Photo by Stacey Williams

Wild as the wind: the Pointe-à-Pierre Wildfowl Trust

Picture a lush oasis of lakes surrounded by green forest, where rare ducks swim among waterlilies, cormorants sun themselves on overhanging branches, and the cries of parakeets fill the air — and all this in the middle of an oil refinery complex. Andre Bagoo visits Trinidad’s Pointe-à-Pierre Wildfowl Trust, celebrating five decades of nurturing endangered birds

Rodney bay, St Lucia. Corbis Images

St Lucia’s Rodney Bay: “Floating, the hills clear in their distances”

For St Lucian writer and cultural activist John Robert Lee, the sheltered beach at Rodney Bay, on the island’s north-western coast, is a place of idyllic childhood memory and peaceful respite

Photo by Virsuziglis/iStock.com

Nassau, The Bahamas

Many visitors come to the Bahamian capital in search of the Caribbean’s “big three” attractions: sun, sea, and sand. There’s plenty of those on New Providence Island, but Nassau is also a creative hub, home to a vibrant arts and craft scene, amazing food — and, of course, the famous festival of Junkanoo

Engage

Photo by Aydinynr/iStock.com

Have internet, will travel

Think of almost any imaginable human behaviour or need, and you can bet someone’s built a website for it. Travel is no exception. Georgia Popplewell compiles a handy survey of the best travel websites and apps to help you make the most of your trip — to the Caribbean or anywhere else in the world

Illustration by Rohan Mitchell

Voyager among gods

Eighty years ago, an African-American anthropologist stepped off a boat in Kingston, at the start of a journey to investigate Caribbean religion and spirituality. Zora Neale Hurston is better remembered for her fiction, writes James Ferguson, but her book Tell My Horse remains a fascinating record of Jamaica and Haiti in the 1930s