Issue 76
(November/December 2005)

In this Issue:

Illustration by James Hackett

Unwelcome guests: Caribbean hurricanes

After two devastating hurricane seasons in a row, Richard Costas looks at the impact of these meteorological disasters on the Caribbean’s economies
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The Calypso Dreams poster. Photograph by Michael Horne/Courtesy Geoffrey Dunn and Michael Horne

Sweet Calypso dreams

Garry Steckles on Calypso Dreams, the documentary by Geoffrey Dunn and Michael Horne that celebrates the golden age of Trinidad calypso
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John Hearne. Photography courtesy Peter Ferguson

John Hearne: two worlds in the blood

James Ferguson wonders if a new edition of John Hearne’s novel Voices Under the Window will revive the reputation of this pioneering Jamaican writer
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Duck treason. Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Caribbean Cookup – November/December 2005

Articles for various contributors on what's cooking in the region
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Pamenos Ballantyne. Photograph by Robert Taylor

Pamenos Ballantyne: “Everyone is a winner”

Vincentian long-distance runner Pamenos Ballantyne on discipline, success, and his plans for the future — as told to Kwame Laurence
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Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Island Hopper – November/December 2005

Dates of events happening around the Caribbean
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Brian Talma in his element. Photograph courtesy Brian Talma

Braving Barbados’ Soup Bowl

The Caribbean’s best-known surfing event catches its biggest wave yet. All eyes on Barbados’s Soup Bowl
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Illustration by Marlon Griffith

Rawle Gibbons: breaking down the Ivory Tower

Rawle Gibbons explains how the Centre for Creative and Festival Arts at UWI’s St Augustine campus rethinks the nature of arts education
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Janluk Stanislas (centre) on the set. Photograph courtesy Daniel Goudrouffe

Marooned?

Guadeloupean Jean-Claude Flamand’s Nèg Maron launches a new wave in French Caribbean cinema
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The Magic Numbers: (from left) Angela and Sean Gannon and Romeo and Michelle Stodart. Photograph courtesy 9PR

Do you believe in magic?

The true Trini roots of UK pop sensation the Magic Numbers
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Machel Montano. Photograph courtesy XTATIK LTD

Rhythm roundup (November/December 2005)

The new music that are reflecting the region right now
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Caribbean Bookshelf (November/December 2005)

The new books that are reflecting the region right now
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Damian “Jr Gong” Marley. Photograph by B+/courtesy Tuff Gong/Universal Records

Damian Marley: The name of the son

Damian “Jr Gong” Marley steps out of his father’s shadow with his new album Welcome to Jamrock
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Illustration by James Hackett

Have her cake and eat it

Attillah Springer on the world’s best black cake — her granny’s
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Ibrahim Ferrer recording a duet with Omara Portuondo. Photograph by Donata Wenders/Courtesy

Ibrahim Ferrer: Bolero Ultimo

Simon Lee remembers Ibrahim Ferrer, the honey-voiced Cuban singer who leaped to fame after he starred on the Buena Vista Social Club album
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Giant termite mounds, a dozen feet tall, tower over the savannah. Photograph by Philip Sander

Aishalton dairy

In Guyana’s remote south Rupununi, the Wapishana village of Aishalton is rarely visited by outsiders. Liam Taylor spent a year teaching there, growing to love the rhythm of this place far from home
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Male rufous-tailed jacamar, a common bird of Trinidad and Tobago’s forests. Photograph by Stephen Broadbridge

Twin-island pleasures: Trinidad & Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago may be the Caribbean’s most various country, an unexpected microcosm of the whole region, sometimes bewildering to visitors. Four locals- Jamie Elliot, Pat Ganase, Tracy Assing, and Dylan Kerrigan- offer personal introductions and insiders' tips to help you have a good time
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The late queen of salsa, Celia Cruz. Photograph courtesy Mary Kent

The Latin Music Hotlist

The Hispanic Caribbean boasts a dizzying diverse musical scene, with sounds ranging from son to jibaro, bomba to salsa, cumbia to reggaeton. Where should the enthusiastic amateur start?
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Oliver Samuels and Louise Bennett on stage. Photograph courtesy the Little Theatre Movement

Jamaica’s pantomime: upstaging tradition

Jamaica’s National Pantomime has been a Christmas-season tradition since the 1940s, entertaining tens of thousands while preserving folk culture
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Issue 76

Issue 76

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