Issue 82
(November/December 2006)

In this Issue:

Richi Spice. Photograph by William Richards, courtesy Fifth Element Records

Higher heights: Richie Spice

Richie Spice finally joins the top tier of reggae artists after a decade of hard work, thanks to the success of his hit song “Brown Skin”
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Marie-Elena John. Photograph courtesy Amstad

Caribbean Bookshelf (November/December 2006)

Marie-Elena John’s debut novel Unburnable, and the glamorous photographs of adopted Tobagonian Norman Parkinson
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Kei Miller. Photograph courtesy Kei Millar

Kei Miller: daring to intrude

Kei Miller brings Jamaica’s religion, superstition, and magic alive in his stories and poems
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Rhythm roundup (November/December 2006)

New albums celebrate the best in Jamaican roots reggae and a Kittitian jazz performer puts his spin on an old artform
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Mattafix: Marlon Roudette and Preetesh Hirji. Photograph courtesy Sainted PR

Music buzz (November/December 2006)

Mattafix turns on Europe with a cocktail of sounds; St Lucia’s Kalalu festival offers the best of live world music...
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Lesley Ann Noel. Photograph by Shirley Bahadur

Lesley Ann Noel: keeping it chic

Trinidadian Lesley Ann Noel creates ethnic lifestyle chic with sustainable designs from around the world
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Illustration by Marlon Griffith

1, 2…18,611: counting the birds

Keeping track of birds at Trinidad’s annual Christmas Bird Count
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Illustration by Marlon Griffith

Island hopper (November/December 2006)

What’s happening in the Caribbean in November and December
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Terry Gajraj. Photograph by Marilyn Kean

Terry Gajraj: “I miss Guyana so much”

Guyanese chutney star Terry Gajraj on promoting his country from afar — as told to Erline Andrews
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Heading for the nylon pool. Photograph by Skene Howie and Jule Guaglardi

40 things to do in Trinidad & Tobago

Racing goats in Easter, starting off the day with hot doubles, visiting a temple in the sea, exploring mud volcanoes & much much more!
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Junkanoo costumes are traditionally made from strips of crêpe paper and cardboard, nowadays ornamented with rhinestones, glitter, and feathers. Photograph courtesy the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism

Junkanoo rush

In the early twentieth century, Bahamas Junkanoo — or John Canoe — was considered a danger to polite society
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Louise Bennett-Coverly, poet, entertainer, and Jamaican national icon. Photograph by the National Library of Jamaica

Remembering Miss Lou

Louise Bennett-Coverley, affectionately known as Miss Lou, was one of the most influential figures in Jamaican culture
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Rebuscar performing in Lopinot. Photograph by Caldeo Sookram

Viva Parang

In Trinidad, the sound of Christmas is parang, a living reminder of the island’s Hispanic heritage
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Illustration by Jason Jarvis

Not just cricket

In 2007, the West Indies will host the ICC Cricket World Cup and the islands’ economies will be boosted
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Illustration by Marlon Griffith

The dream catcher, by Janice Levy

A short story by Janice Levy
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Joseph Zobel. Photograph by Gamma, Camera Press London

Joseph Zobel: voice of Martinique

James Ferguson remembers the late Joseph Zobel, a man whose writings tracked Martinique’s progress from its poverty-stricken past to modern prosperity
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Illustration by Shalini Seereeram

Table for one

Anu Lakhan discovers the fears — and joys — of eating alone • Adam Key Raney explores wine making in a bucket and learns the key to making sorrel...
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Illustration by James Hackett

Uncomfortable truth

For many years, Joseph Zobel’s novel La Rue Cases Negres was banned in his home island of Martinique. James Ferguson explains why
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No to hate illustration by Jason Jarvis

No to hate: dancehall & gay-bashing lyrics

Garry Steckles looks at the gay-bashing lyrics of dancehall and reminds us that the true message of roots reggae is One Love
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Are you feeling lucky? Photograph by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Bets are on

Casinos are big business in the Caribbean, and only getting bigger
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Illustration by James Hackett

Bishop’s girls don’t cry

At the end of a love affair, Attillah Springer wonders whether Bishop’s girls can really have tabanca. Blame it on her alma mater . . .
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After 66 years in the air, BWIA ends its service on 31 December 2006

Issue 82

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